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Electrode Placements Neck Pain

Cervical or Neck Pain in One Location

E-set: For unilateral pain occurring on the back of the neck, the small round Primary Electrode should be placed directly over the pain site. This placement may be directly over the spine as in the photo above or just to the side of the spine.

One corner of the rectangular Secondary Electrode should be located just posterior to the AC joint and be placed along the spine of scapula as shown in the
photo above. This is a very comfortable location to receive stimulation from the rectangular Secondary Electrode and will not limit the patient from increasing the intensity felt under the small round electrode over the pain site.

In addition to the sensation felt in the volume of tissue beneath the electrodes, patients may feel a mild comfortable tingling sensation running from the base of the skull to the crown of the head. This is due to stimulation of the occipital nerve.

Cervical or Neck Pain in Two Locations

B-set: For two separate painful locations, two round 2-inch diameter Primary Electrodes should be placed directly over the two painful areas. For example if pain presents on the back of the neck and in the trapezius or rhomboid as in the photo above, then each round Primary Electrode should be placed over each painful location.

There is no maximum distance for the spacing between the electrodes.

In addition to the sensation felt in the volume of tissue beneath the electrodes, patients may feel a mild, comfortable tingling sensation running from the base of the skull to the crown of the head. This is due to stimulation of the occipital nerve.​

Bilateral Neck Pain

B-set: For bilateral cervical pain across the spine, each round Primary Electrode should be placed directly over the two painful areas. The two round 2-inch diameter Primary Electrodes should be placed approximately 0.5 to 1.0 inch apart from one another as shown in the photo above. The electrodes should not be placed on the side or front of the neck.

In addition to the sensation felt in the volume of tissue beneath the electrodes, patients may feel a mild comfortable tingling sensation running from the base of the skull to the crown of the head. This is due to stimulation of the occipital nerve.​

Neck Pain Over Several Cervical Discs

B-set: For cervical pain centered over the spine over a large area, each round Primary Electrode should be placed over the spine in a vertical fashion directly over the painful areas. The two round electrodes should be approximately 0.5 to 1.0 inch apart from one another as shown in the photo above.

In addition to the sensation felt in the volume of tissue beneath the electrodes, patients may feel a mild comfortable tingling sensation running from the base of the skull to the crown of the head. This is due to stimulation of the occipital nerve.

Scalene Myofacial Pain

E-set: For scalene myofascial pain occurring on the neck, the small round Primary Electrode should be placed directly over the location of pain as in the photo above.

One corner of the rectangular Secondary Electrode should be located just posterior to the AC joint and be placed along the spine of scapula as shown in the
photo above. This is a very comfortable location to receive stimulation from the rectangular Secondary Electrode and will not limit the patient from increasing the intensity felt under the small round electrode over the pain site.

Warning: Electrodes must not touch each other.

Cervical Radiculopathy

B-set: Two same sized round electrodes are used. One is placed in the most proximal location where the pain first presents, for example on the shoulder.

The second electrode is placed over the source or origin of the pain on the cervical spine. For example, if the radiculopathy is caused by a herniated disc at C3, then the second electrode should be placed directly over C3 so that the electrical field captures the source of the pain as well. If, for example, the pain radiates down the right side, then the electrode over the origin of pain should actually be placed approximately 0.5 inches to the right of center so that the electrical field which forms beneath the electrode captures the pain signals in the direction they are traveling.

In addition to the sensation felt in the volume of tissue beneath the electrodes, patients may feel a mild, comfortable tingling sensation running from the base of the skull to the crown of the head. This is due to stimulation of the occipital nerve.

There is no maximum spacing between the electrodes.

TMJ Pain

E-set: For pain originating at the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ), the small round Primary Electrode should be placed directly over the pain site on the side of the jaw.

The electrical field that forms under the round Primary Electrode causes muscle tissue to be held in tension. Therefore with this electrode placement, patients will feel their facial tissue pulled toward the treatment location. The patient may feel a little fasciculation (twitching) in their eye and/or lip on the side of their face that they are treating. This is normal when treating TMJ pain. If the patient has amalgam (metal) fillings in their teeth, particularly in molars in their mandible, the patient may feel stimulation into the roots of their teeth where the amalgams are located. If this is uncomfortable for the patient, they should reduce the intensity or not continue with the treatment.

The rectangular Secondary Electrode should be located just posterior to the AC joint at the top of the shoulder and be placed at an angle along the spine of scapula as shown in the first photo above for cervical or neck pain in one location. This is a very comfortable location to receive stimulation from the rectangular Secondary Electrode.