Body Position

Body Position During Treatment

Position of the body during the treatment is important. This applies to a 30-minute static pain treatment as well as for the first 8 minutes prior to beginning active therapy during treatment. The tissue being treated should be a little taut or in a stretch position. Generally, sitting in a supported position in a comfortable padded chair in a physician’s office or on a physical therapy or athletic training table is best for most treatment locations on the body. ​​​​​​​​Specific body positions for specific treatment locations are listed below.

Low Back, Buttocks, Pelvic Floor

The torso should be at approximately 90 degrees to the legs causing tissue in the low back and buttocks to be more taut. For example, the patient may be in a sitting position, or lying on their side in a fetal position. If necessary, the patient can be in a prone position during the treatment.

Ribs, Obliques

Sitting in a supported position is typicaly most comfortable for the patient.

Hips, Groin

Lying supine with the legs straight is best for groin and hip treatments. Use a pillow under the buttocks to place the hips or groin in a little more of a stretch position.

Quadriceps

Sitting with the knee bent at 90 degrees is best for quadriceps treatments.

Hamstrings

Sitting with the torso at 90 degrees to the legs and the knees straight is best for hamstring treatments.

Knees

The knee should be bent at approximately 90 degrees. This angle provides the strongest sensation in the knee during the treatment which will yield the best outcome. For posterior knee treatments, the knee should be kept straight.

Ankles, Feet

Sitting with the foot pressing on a flat surface is the best position. The foot should be at approximately 90 degrees to the tibia. If necessary, the foot may be elevated during treatment.

Neck

For neck treatments, the head should be bent forward to keep the tissue on the back of the neck tauter. Use medical tape over the back of the electrodes to help hold them in place during the treatment.

Shoulders

For shoulder treatments, sitting in a supported position or lying supine are most comfortable for the patient. The arm should rest against the side of the body with the elbow slightly bent.

For anterior shoulder treatments, generally the patient should be sitting on a treatment table. If the patient can tolerate some internal rotation, the patient should gently move their hand behind their buttock and sit on the back side of their fingers. This helps to slightly open the subacromial space and allow the electrical field to focus on the supraspinatus tendon. If the patient cannot tolerate internal rotation, then the arm should rest near the side of the body.

Elbows, Wrists, Hands & Fingers

The arm should rest on the side of the body with the elbow bent at approximately 80 degrees.

The patient should rest their forearm on their lap and hold a ball or a rolled up towel to keep their hand and fingers in a comfortable position during the treatment.

The patient may operate the intensity of the BioWave stimulator with their other hand.